Apple News Today

by Apple News

Join Shumita Basu and Duarte Geraldino every weekday morning as they guide you through some of the most fascinating stories in the news — and how the world’s best journalists are covering them.

  

Latest Episodes

How Capitol security failed to stop the insurrection

For the first time since the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, key officials who were in charge of security that day have testified before Congress. The Washington Post reports that one big question raised at the hearing was whether domestic terror is taken as seriously as foreign threats.

Politico reports on Democratic claims of a double standard for Biden cabinet nominees that affects women and people of color.

Online coaches are pushing the idea that positive thinking can help people “manifest” their way into making more money. Cosmopolitan reports that women, who’ve been hit especially hard by the pandemic, are the main target.

Fast-food companies are cutting less-popular items to streamline their menus during the pandemic. The Wall Street Journal highlights the elaborate campaigns people are mounting online to bring back personal favorites.


Audio Download

Posted on 24 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


Rich countries corner global vaccine supply

International agreements are to make sure all countries have equitable access to vaccines. But Vox argues that the U.S. and other wealthy countries need to do more. One obstacle to fair distribution is price transparency: NPR looks at why many developing countries are paying much higher prices for doses.

Since Election Day, at least six Facebook employees have resigned while calling out the company’s leaders for failing to address the spread of misinformation and hate speech on the platform. BuzzFeed News reports on former employees who say Facebook’s leadership is working against its own content-moderation policies.

In 1955, Black teen Claudette Colvin was arrested for refusing to give up her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama, 10 months before Rosa Parks got national attention for a similar act of civil disobedience. Colvin spoke with CNN for a new series called “History Refocused.”

Yesterday, electronic-music duo Daft Punk announced they’re calling it quits. GQ takes a look at the iconic group’s influence on music and culture. And the L.A. Times looks at their 10 greatest moments.


Audio Download

Posted on 23 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


How America can learn from its pandemic mistakes

The United States is near half a million deaths from COVID-19, the most in the world. Politico writes that while this crisis has exposed some of the deepest flaws in our public-health system, it has also revealed possibilities for improvements going forward.

Merrick Garland, who was previously snubbed for a Supreme Court seat, has been tapped by President Biden for the role of attorney general. NPR breaks down Garland’s legal background. And the Guardian explains that he will be taking over the Department of Justice during a difficult moment.

The freezing conditions that left millions of Texans without electricity and safe drinking water also impacted migrants on the border. The Guardian reports on the dangers for those seeking to enter the U.S. And the Washington Post looks at Biden’s immigration moves so far.

Online learning means college students have new opportunities to cheat while taking tests from home. Forbes reveals how some are using an online service called Chegg to access answers on demand. 


Audio Download

Posted on 22 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


The political fallout from the winter energy crisis in Texas

The blackouts in Texas have led to significant political fallout. CNBC looks at the claims politicians are making and the facts about the outage.

Many Republicans are working to make upcoming elections a referendum on reopening schools. Political reporter Dave Weigel writes for the Washington Post on why the GOP sees this issue as a key way to speak to suburban voters.

In one small Brazilian city, an unusual experiment is taking place that may provide key insights about how to bring the pandemic to an end. The Wall Street Journal has the story about this first-of-its-kind study.

New York Magazine is out with a profile of rising-star director Chloé Zhao, whose film Nomadland comes out today.


Audio Download

Posted on 19 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


U.S. life expectancy falls by entire year as pandemic rages

The crisis is not over in Texas, as power outages and brutal weather continue to have a broad impact. The Texas Tribune looks at how people are suffering from food shortages and the loss of clean drinking water.

Life expectancy in America dropped by an entire year over the first six months of 2020. Bloomberg News looks at new CDC data that captures some the realities of the pandemic in hard numbers, including large racial disparities.

Even after the economic crisis has ended, certain jobs will probably be gone for good. The Washington Post explains why this is happening and what it means for the future of the U.S. economy.

NASA is preparing to land a rover on Mars. Vox explains how this high-stakes, complex mission is supposed to work.


Audio Download

Posted on 18 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


Are New York and California turning on their governors?

New York governor Andrew Cuomo and California governor Gavin Newsom drew praise early in the pandemic but have recently come under criticism. Bloomberg News looks at why their popularity has taken a turn for the worse. And the Wall Street Journal looks at the impact on Cuomo’s approval ratings.

Conservative organizations raised hundreds of millions of dollars to support baseless challenges to the presidential election results. The Washington Post has the story of one major donor who wants his money back.

Snow, ice, and freezing temperatures are gripping many parts of the United States. Texas is having a particularly hard time, in part because of its strained power grid. Vox explains what’s gone wrong with the grid and why the state wasn’t more prepared. 

Researchers are increasingly convinced of the therapeutic effects of spending time outside. The Wall Street Journal explains why some believe two hours a week in nature could be the new 10,000 steps per day.


Audio Download

Posted on 17 February 2021 | 12:02 pm


Have we turned a corner on COVID-19? Not yet.

For the first time in months, average new daily coronavirus infections have fallen below 100,000 in the United States. The Washington Post looks at possible reasons for this decline. And NPR speaks with an epidemiologist who warns that the country still has a long road ahead.

A Marshall Project investigation into the use of police dogs finds a city where they are regularly unleashed against Black teens.

A record-breaking wave of extreme cold has turned deadly and is threatening COVID-19 vaccination progress. USA Today looks at the impact.

Even with bars closed and no parade, folks in New Orleans are finding ways to celebrate Mardi Gras. The Washington Post describes how some residents are decorating their homes as parade floats, in the first “Yardi Gras.”


Audio Download

Posted on 16 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


Trump’s legal challenges are just getting started

Donald Trump was acquitted by the Senate for a second time this weekend, but his legal troubles may just be beginning. CNN has a roundup of his post-impeachment legal challenges. And Vox looks at recent developments in Trump investigations in Georgia and New York.

Today, former Nigerian finance minister Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala becomes the first African and first woman to lead the World Trade Organization. Politico breaks down the challenges she is facing during a tumultuous period of global trade. And Okonjo-Iweala tells Time that among her biggest priorities will be the role of the WTO in combating climate change and addressing the coronavirus pandemic.

Attacks against Asian Americans are on the rise, including in the San Francisco Bay Area. NPR spoke with the executive director of the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, which has documented nearly 3,000 incidents of attacks against anti-Asian from across the country since the pandemic began last March. And NBC News reports on recent actions by the Biden administration to tackle this issue.

In 2019, Taylor Swift announced that she would rerecord and rerelease her back catalog. On Friday, she dropped her new version of “Love Story,” and the song has already topped the U.S. iTunes chart. The Atlantic explains why this enterprise is such a savvy business move.


Audio Download

Posted on 15 February 2021 | 12:00 pm


Trump’s team makes his case

Today, Donald Trump’s defense team make their case in the Senate impeachment trial. Axios breaks down the arguments we can expect to hear. The Washington Post explores the history behind Trump’s First Amendment defense. And the Hill says many Republicans have already signaled that their minds are made up.

Two companies that make voting machines have filed multimillion-dollar antidefamation lawsuits against the likes of Fox News and Rudy Giuliani. The Washington Post explains how repeated falsehoods about voting irregularities have damaged trust in these companies.

Indian prime minister Narendra Modi wants to give 300 million people a COVID-19 vaccine by mid-summer. NPR reports that the plan is being called the biggest and most ambitious vaccination drive in the world. 

Today, Donald Trump’s defense team make their case in the Senate impeachment trial. Axios breaks down the arguments we can expect to hear. The Washington Post explores the history behind Trump’s First Amendment defense. And the Hill says many Republicans have already signaled that their minds are made up.

Two companies that make voting machines have filed multimillion-dollar antidefamation lawsuits against the likes of Fox News and Rudy Giuliani. The Washington Post explains how repeated falsehoods about voting irregularities have damaged trust in these companies.

Indian prime minister Narendra Modi wants to give 300 million people a COVID-19 vaccine by mid-summer. NPR reports that the plan is being called the biggest and most ambitious vaccination drive in the world. 

The pandemic has been a huge motivator for people to declutter their homes and give away old household items on free-stuff forums. The Wall Street Journal writes about the wide variety of items posted on these pages.


Audio Download

Posted on 12 February 2021 | 12:00 pm